X

Take that perfect shot

  • Are you just about to set off on your travels? Want to be able to show your friends some breathtaking photographs when you get home? If so read on as Hostelworld.com has ten helpful tips to help you take some unforgettable pictures...

  • 1. Know how to use your camera

    This may seem obvious, but many people only know how to ‘point and shoot’ with their cameras and nothing else. Digital cameras these days, SLR or otherwise, have loads of really useful settings and functions and, as you’re about to see some great sights and be in some interesting situations (visually!), to be able to show them best know how your camera works. Also, many people believe the bigger the amount of megapixels the better the picture. The only reason to have your image size setting at 4MP or higher is if you plan on blowing it up into a poster. If it’s simply for something like your blog or Facebook, or if the biggest you’ll ever be getting pictures developed is the standard 6” x 4”, get more photos on your memory card by leaving the size of your pictures at 2MP.

  • 2. Always have your camera ready

    It’s hard to think of anything more annoying than seeing something that would make a great shot, be it a bird passing in the sky or somebody standing in the rain under an umbrella, and then by the time you get your camera out the moment’s gone. To make sure this doesn’t happen to you always have your camera at the ready. You won’t regret it.

  • 3. Use the 'rule of thirds' for good composition

    The 'rule of thirds' means dividing what's on the viewfinder on your camera into thirds like this. Pretty straight forward you have to admit. This then creates four important parts of the photo that you may want to put points of interest at. These four points are the four corners of the square created in the middle. It also creates lines. Try putting the subject of the shots at intersections of the lines, or along the lines themselves.

  • 4. Use ‘golden hour’

    Also known as ‘magic hour’, golden hour is the first and last hour of sunlight. Taking photos during this hour can be a lot easier than in the middle of the day when the sun is high in the sky as it won’t glare into your lense and awkward shadows aren’t created. During this hour you can witness some beautiful variations of blue, pink, orange and more in the sky. And if there are clouds in the sky, even better. They’ll help create even better pictures. This picture on Railay Beach in Thailand was one of many taken during golden hour. And there’s another tip – if you have the memory take multiple pictures, then choose the best one!

  • 5. Get yourself a tripod

    Unless you’re made of stone and can stay completely still from anything between two seconds and twenty seconds, taking good night shots will prove to be difficult. Sure, you can use things to balance your camera on such as bins / trash cans or even people, but for good pictures after dark you’ll need to get yourself a tripod. This photo of Melbourne’s skyline wouldn’t have been possible had it not been for a tripod.

  • 6. Have some guts!

    People make interesting pictures. It’s as simple as that. But to get the shots of those people you need to be prepared to take pictures of them in the first place. Obviously, the right thing to do is to ask first of all. But if you do that you run the risk of them saying no. If you just point and shoot and get that picture they might mind, or they may not, but the final outcome is that you may have a picture that could win you awards! The man in this picture taken on this long boat in Thailand certainly didn't mind his picture being taken.

  • 7. Make use of colour

    Sometimes even the simplest of subjects can make great pictures thanks to colour. This can be something like cups of coffee on a table or, in this case, shisha pipes in a shop in Granada. The contrast of the strong colours against each other makes for a good shot.

  • 8. Try being abstract

    Try being abstract when taking photos. Things such as a close up of a nail in a wall, the ripples in a puddle from the rain, or in this case, the reflection in a puddle, can make for really cool pictures. This picture of a taxi in New York City shows it from a different perspective.

  • 9. Don’t be afraid to direct people

    Telling everybody to get into a photograph is well and good, but without directing them you might find that somebody’s head is cut off, or there are gaps between people when they’d look better tighter together. To avoid this happening, don’t be afraid to direct people in the right way.

  • 10. Think out of the box

    If you take a picture of the Sydney Opera House from Mrs Macquarie's Chair or the Eiffel Tower from Place du Trocadero, you can be guaranteed one thing – there are a million other people in the world with the exact same photo. We’re not saying don’t take those photos, because you should. But try and get a different perspective of a landmark. This photo is clearly the aforementioned Eiffel Tower, but as it’s only one small part of it and it's to the right of the shot, it makes it different to others.

  • Are you just about to set off on your travels? Want to be able to show your friends some breathtaking photographs when you get home? If so read on as Hostelworld.com has ten helpful tips to help you take some unforgettable pictures...

  • 1. Know how to use your camera

    This may seem obvious, but many people only know how to ‘point and shoot’ with their cameras and nothing else. Digital cameras these days, SLR or otherwise, have loads of really useful settings and functions and, as you’re about to see some great sights and be in some interesting situations (visually!), to be able to show them best know how your camera works. Also, many people believe the bigger the amount of megapixels the better the picture. The only reason to have your image size setting at 4MP or higher is if you plan on blowing it up into a poster. If it’s simply for something like your blog or Facebook, or if the biggest you’ll ever be getting pictures developed is the standard 6” x 4”, get more photos on your memory card by leaving the size of your pictures at 2MP.

  • 2. Always have your camera ready

    It’s hard to think of anything more annoying than seeing something that would make a great shot, be it a bird passing in the sky or somebody standing in the rain under an umbrella, and then by the time you get your camera out the moment’s gone. To make sure this doesn’t happen to you always have your camera at the ready. You won’t regret it.

  • 3. Use the 'rule of thirds' for good composition

    The 'rule of thirds' means dividing what's on the viewfinder on your camera into thirds like this. Pretty straight forward you have to admit. This then creates four important parts of the photo that you may want to put points of interest at. These four points are the four corners of the square created in the middle. It also creates lines. Try putting the subject of the shots at intersections of the lines, or along the lines themselves.

  • 4. Use ‘golden hour’

    Also known as ‘magic hour’, golden hour is the first and last hour of sunlight. Taking photos during this hour can be a lot easier than in the middle of the day when the sun is high in the sky as it won’t glare into your lense and awkward shadows aren’t created. During this hour you can witness some beautiful variations of blue, pink, orange and more in the sky. And if there are clouds in the sky, even better. They’ll help create even better pictures. This picture on Railay Beach in Thailand was one of many taken during golden hour. And there’s another tip – if you have the memory take multiple pictures, then choose the best one!

  • 5. Get yourself a tripod

    Unless you’re made of stone and can stay completely still from anything between two seconds and twenty seconds, taking good night shots will prove to be difficult. Sure, you can use things to balance your camera on such as bins / trash cans or even people, but for good pictures after dark you’ll need to get yourself a tripod. This photo of Melbourne’s skyline wouldn’t have been possible had it not been for a tripod.

  • 6. Have some guts!

    People make interesting pictures. It’s as simple as that. But to get the shots of those people you need to be prepared to take pictures of them in the first place. Obviously, the right thing to do is to ask first of all. But if you do that you run the risk of them saying no. If you just point and shoot and get that picture they might mind, or they may not, but the final outcome is that you may have a picture that could win you awards! The man in this picture taken on this long boat in Thailand certainly didn't mind his picture being taken.

  • 7. Make use of colour

    Sometimes even the simplest of subjects can make great pictures thanks to colour. This can be something like cups of coffee on a table or, in this case, shisha pipes in a shop in Granada. The contrast of the strong colours against each other makes for a good shot.

  • 8. Try being abstract

    Try being abstract when taking photos. Things such as a close up of a nail in a wall, the ripples in a puddle from the rain, or in this case, the reflection in a puddle, can make for really cool pictures. This picture of a taxi in New York City shows it from a different perspective.

  • 9. Don’t be afraid to direct people

    Telling everybody to get into a photograph is well and good, but without directing them you might find that somebody’s head is cut off, or there are gaps between people when they’d look better tighter together. To avoid this happening, don’t be afraid to direct people in the right way.

  • 10. Think out of the box

    If you take a picture of the Sydney Opera House from Mrs Macquarie's Chair or the Eiffel Tower from Place du Trocadero, you can be guaranteed one thing – there are a million other people in the world with the exact same photo. We’re not saying don’t take those photos, because you should. But try and get a different perspective of a landmark. This photo is clearly the aforementioned Eiffel Tower, but as it’s only one small part of it and it's to the right of the shot, it makes it different to others.


1 Comments

  • Stevo Thursday, August 6th, 2009, 1:57pm

    Great tips...thanks!

  • Add your Comment...
Please give us your feedback